Black Salve

Answers to your questions about salve

There are pages on this site designed to answer these questions. Just check the menu, or Contact Me to find out what you want to know.

  • What is this stuff really?
  • Is it a drawing salve?
  • Is it the same as bloodroot paste?
  • How does it work?
  • How long has it been around?
  • Why does the medical profession promote fear?
  • Can I see factual testimonies?
  • What are the ingredients?
  • What are their properties?
  • Does it harm normal skin?
  • Can I test it on my skin first?
  • How do I use it safely?
  • What can I expect?

It is important that you find answers to these questions before you use salve. You really need to have a healthy respect for this stuff. 

What would you like to know? 

  • Yes, Bloodroot Salve works. It has been used successfully in its current form – which is basically a paste of bloodroot powder and zinc chloride – for over one hundred and fifty years. It is not a “drawing salve” and it is not bloodroot paste. Dermatological surgeons still use it, calling it zinc or bloodroot paste, or Mohs Paste. Veterinarians use it to remove cancers from animals. I don’t believe it’s the only way to remove a cancer “naturally” but it is definitely one way. 

 

  • Yes, there are literally hundreds of testimonials and photo or video journals on the net. You can see people removing BCC, SCC, sarcoma, breast cancer and melanoma. Studies have demonstrated the anti-cancer properties of bloodroot’s active chemical, sanguinarine. Sad but true, these studies recommend further investigation – and it stops there. 

 

  • Physicians were using the Salve as early as the mid 1850s, and Fells in particular became famous for removing breast cancers without mastectomy. The famous Frederic Mohs used a paste of bloodroot and zinc chloride in his ground-breaking procedure. Today dermatological surgeons are using a paste of bloodroot and zinc chloride to treat melanomas and other skin cancers… in spite of the fact that FDA has prosecuted and jailed others for promoting its use.

 

  • Modern Salve contains other ingredients that have improved its action. It is classed as an escharotic. Escharotics have been used for centuries: Paracelsus documents their use and ingredients: a mineral caustic and a botanical. When the pH is close enough to neutral, no burning occurs.

 

  • Bloodroot Salve is a selective escharotic which means that it kills only neoplasms (growths), and they become eschar. This scab is not the result of burning or corrosion. Eschar is only scab, we’ve all had one, and it’s composed mainly of dead tissue cells and dead blood cells, mainly the white blood cells that attack any body invaders that they recognize. Scab forms as part of a healing process.

 

  • A good Salve does not harm normal tissue, it does not burn and it does not corrode, contrary to the statements by its detractors. You can prove it quite easily. I have used it on myself and on others, and always test the salve first on normal skin. There will be slight or no reaction. I have never seen healthy tissue damaged by salve. After a tumor has come out, I will reapply salve into the cavity if there is a white spot. Another eschar will form. 

 

  • Why does it react with questionable lesions? The spot can be growing away quietly and happily, just doing its thing, apparently invisible to the body’s immune system. Salve has an effect on the tumor that makes it suddenly visible to the immune system, so it attacks. It becomes a combined reaction between your immune system and the salve. This attack takes on the form of inflammation: redness, heat, pus, and pain. The salve and the white blood cells target the lesion, and its days are numbered! Eventually the body will eject the lump, leaving a cavity. 

 

  • Before deciding to use salve on yourself or on a pet, you need to do your homework. Be prepared, know what to expect. Get a diagnosis or an opinion. Use an experienced practitioner if possible. Be sure to look at the stories of other people. We have some here. There are many.

 

  • Many doctors and “quacks” have been condemned or threatened for using Black Salve, even though it worked so quickly and visibly. Recently an MD in the USA was threatened with de-registration for supplying pain relief to a patient who had opted to use salve. The patient dared to use a cancer alternative, and a doctor dared to fulfill the request for pain relief. What were they afraid of? 

 

  • Photos of Salve treatments have been shown on the internet to horrify the public. But they never show the area after healing. The eschar and decavitation stages (when the tumor comes out) are not attractive, but  they are stages of treatment. The tumor becomes a scab and it falls out. Then the area heals… If a surgeon proposes cutting into your face, will he show you photos of a face opened by scalpel? Or will he show you the photo of a face that has healed?

 

  • Be aware that some people will say you can remove warts and moles with salve. If they are not cancerous or precancerous, it will most likely not work as expected. Bloodroot paste, not salve, is the topical to be used for warts, moles, skin tags, etc. It is applied daily. Bloodroot powder (capsules are preferable) can also be taken internally in very small doses to treat any kind of lesion.

 

  • Some report they ingested actual Salve with good results, but I would not recommend it. Bloodroot capsules contain a measured dose.

 

It’s your body, your health. You have options. There is a lot of good info out there.

Weigh up the alternatives and choose the one that seems right for you.

Don’t make your decision to please others.

It’s easier than you think to find the right alternative.

 

 

 See also

 

3 Comments

  • Rose

    If it adheres, it’s a positive sign. Sometimes it fall off, but there is a reaction still. When the salve adheres or sinks in to the lesion, it’s a positive sign.

  • Marty Peoples

    I started my treatment yesterday. Today when I changed my bandage the black salve was stuck to my skin, so I left it on and bandaged it anew. Since it adhered to the spot, does that mean it is positive? My spot looked exactly like basal cell carcinoma, although I did not have it diagnosed as such. having used a different salve in the past, it feels like it is working. But when using anything new, there are always questions.

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